2017 McGraw-Hill SAT Vocab

Abstract
(adj) ab- away + tractus pulledexisting as an idea but not as a tangible experience

Anthropology
(n) anthro human + -ology study ofthe study and comparison of human cultures

Comprehensive
(adj) com- together + prehendere to graspthorough and complete; converting all relevant subjects

Construe
(v) con- together + struere to buildto interpret in a particular way

Discerning
(adj) dis- apart + cernere to separateshowing a keen ability to distinguish subtle elements

Discriminating
(adj) dis- apart + crimen judicial decisionshowing good taste or judgement

Disseminate
(v) dis- widely + semen seedto vast (something, usually information) widely, as seed is scattered

Erudite
(adj) e-not + rudis untrained, unwroughthaving or showing great learning or knowledge

Indoctrinate
(v) in- in + docere to teachto teach someone to accept a set of beliefs uncritically

Insular
(adj) insula islandisolated from cultural and intellectual influences outside one’s own experience

Orthodox
(adj) orthos right, straight + docere to teachconforming strictly to traditional teachings

Pedantic
(adj) pedante schoolmasterinclined to show off one’s learning or knowledge; acting like know-it-all

Pursue
(v) per- thoroughly + use useto read thoroughly and carefully

Postulate
(v) assume the existence or truth of something as a basis for reasoning

Provincial
(adj) unsophisticated or narrow-minded; particular to the narrow views of an isolated community

Revelation
(n) a fact revealed in a surprising way

Advocate
(v) ad- for + vocare to call, to give voiceto provide public support for a person, cause, or policy

Apologist
(n) apo- away + logos word, studyone who argues for a particular, often controversial position

Appease
(v) pais peaceto yield to demands in order to conciliatte

Bolster
(v) to strengthen or support

Buttress
(n) a projecting support for a building; usually of stone or brick; any strong support(v) to provide with support or justification

Cajole
(v) to persuade through flattery or coaxing

Curcumlocutory
(adj) circum around + loqui to talkinclined to speak evasively; speaking as if to avoid the subject

Cirumscribe
(v) circum around + scribere to write or drawto define the limits of something, often an issue or problem

Cohesive
(adj) co-together + haerere to stickforming a united whole

Conjecture
(n) con- together + ject throwna guess based on incomplete information

Consensus
(n) con- together + sentire to feel[1] general agreement[2] the generally held opinion on a matter

Contentious
(adj) causing or likely to provoke an argument

Credulous
(adj) credere to believewilling to believe

Criteria
(n,pl) kritikos judgeprinciples or standards by which something is judged or decided

Cursory
(adj) currere to runhasty or superficial

Debunk
(v) to expose the falseness of a belief

Deliniate
de- completely + lineare to create with linesto describe or portray precisely

Dispel
(v) dis- away + pellere to forceto drive away; eliminate a rumor, misconception, or bad feeling

Disputatious
(adj) dis- apart + putare to reckon[1] (of a person) fond of having heated arguments[2] (of a situation) likely to cause an argument

Elucidate
(v) lux lightto make clear; to shed light on

Enticement
(n) something that attracts or tempts, particularly because it offers pleasure or advantage

Enumerate
(v) e-out + numerus numberto list one by one

Equivocate
(v) equi- same + vocare to callto speak ambiguously so as to avoid commitment

Exhortation
(n) ex- out + hortari to encouragea strong plea, usually through an urgent speech

Exonerate
(v) ex- out, from + onus burdento absolve someone of blame or fault

Fallacious
(adj) fallere to deceive, to be untruebased on a mistaken belief or unsound reasoning

Harangue
(n) a lengthy and bombastic speech

Incongruous
(adj) in- not + con together + ruere to fallnot consistent with expectations or surroundings

Induce
(v) in- in + ducere to lead[1] to bring about[2] to persuade to do something[3] to derive by inductive (from specific instances to general principles) reasoning

Inexorable
(adj) [1] (of an eventually) unpreventable[2] (of a person) impossible to persuade

Infer
(v) in- into +ferre to bring, to bearto conclude from evidence

Insinuate
(v) to suggest or hint at something, usually something morally dubious

Intransigent
(adj) stubbornly unwilling to compromise or agree with someone

Irresolute
(adj) ir- not + re- (intensive) + solvere to loosenhesitant; showing lack of certainty or determination

Litgious
(adj) unreasonably prone to suing as a means of settling disputes

Obstinate
(adj) stubbornly refusing to change one’s position

Partisan
(adj) prejudiced in favor of a particular party, typically a political one

Placate
(v) placare to pleaseto pacify with conciliatory gestures

Precedent
(n) pre- before + cedere to goa previous ocurence that is used as an example, particularly in a legal context

Prevalent
(adj) pre- before + valere to have powerabundant and widespread in a particular area

Prospenity
(n) pro- forward + pendere to hanga natural inclination to behave a certain way

Provacative
(adj) pro- forward + vocare to call[1] intended to cause a strong negative emotional response[2] intended to arouse sexual desire

Pugnacious
(adj) pugnare to fightquarrelsome; prone to fighting

Qualify
(v) qualis of what kind[1] to moderate a statement to make it less extreme[2] to meet a necessary condition (for)

Rebut
(v) to respond to an accusation by asserting or proving false; refute

Recalcitrant
(adj) re-back + calcitrate to kick with the heelstubbornly uncooperative

Refute
(v) re- back + futare to beatto prove something false

Resolute
(adj) unwaringly purposeful and dutiful

Rhetoric
(n)[1] the art of persuasion through language[2] language that is persuasive but insincere or meaningless

Specious
(adj) seemingly plausible, but actually incorrect

Speculation
(n) specere to looka guess based on meager evidence

Streadfast
(adj) dutifully firm and unwavering

Strident
(adj) annoyingly loud and harsh, particularly when presenting a point of view

Subjective
(adj) sub under + ject thrownbased on personal feelings or opinions

Substantiate
(v) provide evidence for

Tenuous
(adj) tenuare to make thin, to stretchflimsy; very weak or slight (esp. pertaining to a link, argument, or relationship)

Tirade
(v) a long, angry, and critical speech

Viable
(adj) vivere to licecapable of working successfully

Vindicate
(v) vin- force + dictum declarationto clear of blame or suspension

Zealot
(n) a fanatic; one who is uncompromising an vehement in pursing ideals

3.

The Language of Dissent, Criticism, and Rebellion

Adversary
(n) ad- to + vertere to turna committed enemy or opponent

Antipathy
(adj) anti- against + pathos feelingdeep-seated dislike

Audacious
(adj) willing to take bold risks

Averse
(adj) ab- away + vertere to turnhaving a strong dislike

Belligerent
(adj) bellum warhostile and aggressive

Berate
(v) to scold angrily

Cantankerous
(adj) grouchy and argumentative

Circumspect
(adj) circum around + specere to lookwary; cautious

Clamor
(n) clamare to cry outan uproar, usually from a crowd showing disapproval

Condescend
(v) con- together + de- down +scandere to climbto act superior to someone else

Encroach
(v) to intrude on a territory or domain

Estranged
(adj) extra outside ofno longer emotionally close to someone; alienated

Evade
(v) e- out of + vadere to goto escape or avoid, usually through clever means

Flout
(v) openly disregard (a rule or convention)

Heresy
(n) a belief or act that contradicts religious orthodoxy

Iconoclast
(n) eikon likeness + klan to break(literally a “breaker of icons”) one who attacks cherished beliefs

Indignant
(adj) in- not + dignus worthyangered by unjust treatment

Instigate
(v) bring about or initiate (an action or event)

Insurgent
(n) in-into + surgere to risea rebel

Malign
(v) malignus tending to evilto speak harmful untruths about

Maverick
(n) a person who thinks independently

Misanthrope
(n) mis bad + anthropos mankindone who dislikes and avoids humans

Rancor
(n) rancidus stinkingdeep-seated resentment

Rebuke
(v) to express sharp and stern disapproval for someone’s actions

Renounce
(v) re-back +nuntiare to announceto give up or put aside publicly

Reprehensible
(adj) re- back + prehendere to graspdeserving of condemnation

Reprove
(v) to reprimand

Revoke
(v) re- back + vocare to callto take back a formal decree, decision, or permission

Subvert
(v) sub- under + vertere to turnto undermine the authority or power of another

Supplant
(v) to replace in importance or relevance

Vilify
(v) vilis worthlessto denounce someone bitterly

Vindictive
(adj) vin force + dictum declaration

4. The Language of Power and Submission

Acquiesce
(v) ad- to + quiescere to restto accept an unpleasant situation or comply to a demand reluctantly

Capitulate
(v) capit headto surrender; to stop resisting

Coerce
(v) co- together + arcere to restrainto force someone to do something by use of threats

Concession
(n) con- together + cedere to yield, to go[1] the act of admitting reluctantly that something is true[2] something surrendered, as land or a right

Contrite
(adj) con-together + tritus rubbedremorseful; full of regret

Deference
(n) de- down + ferre to bringrespect for or submission to the authority or opinion of another

Demagogue
(n) demos people + agogos leadinga leader who persuades followers through emotional populists appeal rather than rational argument

Despot
(n) potentia powera (usually cruel) ruler with absolute power

Dictatorial
(adj) dicere to declarecharacteristic of a ruler with total power; tyrannical

Diffident
(adj) dis- away + fidere to trustlacking in self-confidence; shy and modest

Domineering
(adj) dominus lord, masterarrogantly overbearing

Eminent
(adj) famous and respected in a particular domain

Enthralling
(adj) thrall slavefascinating; captivating

Exploitative
(adj) intended to take selfish advantage of a situation or person

Hierarchy
(n) hieros sacred + arkhes rulera power structure in which members are ranked by status

Imperious
(adj) imperare to commandbossy and domineering

Impervious
(adj) im- not + per- throughnot able to be influenced (by)

Indelible
(adj) in- not + delere to destroy, to eliminateforming an enduring impression; unfogettable

Insolent
(adj) rude and disrespectful

Insubordination
(n) in- not + sub- under + ordinare to rankan act of defying authority; disobedience

Mandate
(n) manus hand + dare to givean official order or commission to do something

Obtrusive
(adj) ob- toward + trudere to push[1] (of things) prominent in an annoying way[2] (of people) obnoxiously intrusive

Pacify
(v) pax peaceto quell the agitation of something; to make peaceful

Pervasive
(adj) per- through + vadere to gowidespread

Potent
(adj) potentia powerparticularly powerful, influential, or effective

Predominant
(adj) dominat ruled, governedacting as the main element or the most powerful influence

Propagate
(v)[1] to spread and promote[2] to breed, as organisms

Recluse
(n) re- back + claudere to closea person who lives a solitary lifestyle

Relinquish
(v) re- (intensive) + linquere to abandonto voluntarily give up

Ruthless
(adj) without mercy

Sanction
(n) [1] official approval[2] a penalty, usually one imposed by one government upon another

Sequester
(v) to isolate from outside influences

Servile
(adj) servus slave[1] excessively willing to serve others[2] pertaining to or akin to slave labor

Subjugate
(v) sub- under + jugum yoketo bring under one’s domination

Tenacious
(adj) tenere to holdholding fast to a position or claim; stubbornly persistent

Tractable
(adj) tracture to pull, to handleeasily managed or influenced

Unremitting
(adj) un- not + re- back + mittere to sendincessant; never decreasing in intensity

Usurper
(n) one who forcibly takes a position of power

5. The Language of Language and Literature

Allude
(v) ad- to + ludere to playto hint at indirectly

Analogy
(n) a correspondence between two things based on structural similarity

Anecdote
(n) a short amusing or informative story

Anthology
(n) anthos flower + logia collectiona published collection of writings

Bombastic
(adj) (pertaining to speech) pompous and blustery, with little meaning

Coherent
(adj) co- together + haerere to stick[1] clear, rational, and consistent[2] forming a united whole

Colloquial
(adj) co- together + loqui to talkpertaining to informal, conversational speech

Derivative
(adj) de- down + rivus streamimitative of someone else’s work and therefore unorigianal

Eclectic
(adj) ex- out + legere to choosederiving from a variety of sources

Eloquent
(adj) loqui to talkarticulate and well spoken

Epilogue
(n) epi- upon, in addition + logos wordsa section at the end of a novel or play that explains the conclusion

Evocative
(adj) e- out + vocare to calltending to draw out strong feelings, ideas, or sensations

Irony
(n) a situation that directly contradicts expectations

Laconic
(adj) Laconia Spartainclined to use very few words

Lament
(v) to mourn or express deep regret

Loquacious
(adj) loqui to talktalkative; tending to chatter

Melodrama
(n) melos music + dramasensational drama designed to appeal to the emotions

Platitude
(n) an overused proverb

Poignant
(adj) pungere to prickemotionally moving; keenly distressing

Satiric
(adj) employing humor, irony, or ridicule to poke fun at something

Verbose
(adj) verbum wordexcessively wordy

6. The Language of Judgment

Ambivalent
(adj) ambi- both + valere to be stronghaving mixed feelings about something

Arbitrary
(adj) arbiter judgebased on personal whim, rather than reason

Arbitrate
(v) arbiter judgeto serve as a neutral third-party judge in a dispute

Carping
(adj) constantly finding fault, particularly about trivial matters

Censor
(v) censere to assessto edit out or repress objectionable material

Censure
(v) censere to assessto express formal disapproval of someone’s behavior

Clemency
(n) clemens mildnessleniency, particularly in judicial sentencing

Conformist
(n) con- together + formone who conscientiously complies with the standards of a group

Contempt
(n) sharp disgust for something deemed unworthy

Cynic
(n) one who believes that humans are essentially selfish

Demeaning
(adj) causing a loss or respect or dignity

Denouce
(v) de- down + nuntiare declarepublicly declare as bad or evil

Depraved
(adj) immoral or wicked

Derision
(n) mockery; contemptuous ridicule

Disdain
(n) dis- not + dignus worthyfeeling that something or someone is unworthy

Dogmatic
(adj) proclaiming an inflexible adherence to religious or political principles

Extol
(v) ex- out + tol ring outto praise enthusiastically

Futile
(adj) futilis leakydoomed to fail; pointless

Inane
(adj) silly, stupid

Irreverent
(adj) ir- not + re- (intensive) + vereri to respectshowing no respect for things that are ordinarily given respect

Mundane
(adj) mundus worlddull and uninteresting

Punitive
(adj) punire to punishintended to punish

Repudiate
(v) to refuse association with

Skeptical
(adj) inclined to doubt; not easily convinced

7. The Language of Extremism and Exxageration

Embellish
(v) bellus beautifulto make a story more interesting by fabricating or exaggerating entertaining details; to decorate

Eradicate
(v) e- out + radix rootto eliminate completely

Hyperbole
(n) hyper above, beyondexaggeration for persuasive effect

Indulgent
(adj) excessively generous or lenient

Superfluous
(adj) super above + fluere to flowunnecessary, excessive

Unstinting
(adj) without reservations; given liberally

8. The Language of Care and Restraint

Ameliorate
(v) to make a situation better

Assuage
(v) to make something unpleasant less intense

Curtail
(v) curtus shortto cut back; to impose a restriction on an activity

Equanimity
(n) equa same + anima spirit, mindevenness of temper

Fastidious
(adj) showing great attention to details, particularly in matters of cleanliness

Impassive
(adj) in- not + passivus sufferedunemotional; calm

Meticulous
(adj) showing finicky attention to details and precision

Nonchalant
(adj) calm and unconcerned, often inappropriately so

Parsimony
(n) parcere to be sparingextreme reluctance to spend money, use unnecessary language, or expand resources

Placid
(adj) placere to please[1]