Close Scene Analysis

Close Scene Analysis Why does the police officer pull him over? What does this say about authority and their trust in the Indigenous? What is the symbolism of Eddie dancing his native dance on the railway tracks? This is the last time we see Eddie drunk in the film. Why might this scene be an important transition for Eddie Non Dietetic sounds at the start of the scene. Helps to build tension Costume It’s dirty and perhaps a symbol of his oppression here on the mainland. Lower camera angles

These Start with the dancing. Could indicate the power that he derives from dance. We see him as more powerful. Higher Camera Angles Helps the viewer to focus on where the dance is taking place. On the railway tracks- a symbol of Eddies oppression and of the advancement of white Australia. Back lighting Creates a sense of power as we see Eddie in a haunting glow. Seems other worldly (like the ancestors that he calls upon). Transition to dietetic sound (Non-dietetic fades out)

Symbolisms the fact that he has called on his ancestors and derived power from them. They are now part of him. Medium Close up Focus on Eddies face as he looks around his environment. Emphasizing the fact that he may have felt others’ presence and helps the viewer sense his rejuvenation. Essay Question. Eddie Mambo is portrayed in the film as an outcast as a result of his conflict with both the Queensland government laws and the traditional laws of his people.

Discuss Eddie Mambo falls victim to Queensland policies of segregation and coordination resulting in disconnection from his adopted homeland prior to any legal action against the Queensland Government. His defiance in the face of authority and pride in his traditional culture culminates in a belief that “people like [him] had to be trouble makers” in order to achieve equality and a ‘fair go’. This was foreshadowed by the celebration of his identity on the railway tracks through both song and dance. The high angle shots capture an indignant Eddie Mambo dancing on railway tracks, a symbol of his oppression.