Cowboys And Indians

The narrator, a young girl call her cousin, David. He arrives in the late afternoon. They leave the reception, to go on for a trip together. David is the outsider who doesn’t fit in. He tried to fit in, when he followed the family bloodline, and joined the army. Now he lives by himself, and rarely have any interaction with the rest of the family. They go to a bar, and makes a toast for their dead grandma, not sure how they are opposed to feel they keep on going into the night.

Then they meet two ballista, whom sense something is wrong with the wind. “This wind, it brings devil spirits with it. This wind it came with you! ” Indicating that they bring trouble. David takes the narrator back to the reception. And drives off into the night. Characterization of the narrator. The narrator is a young girl, on the verge to womanhood, would estimate her age to be about 18-20 years. She initially seems like the good girl. She is attending her grandma’s funeral. She serves food and drinks at the mandatory reception, while small talking with the other attendees. Sees not until she calls her cousin David that this image starts to shatter. Just for her to be leaving the funeral reception, seems to be frown upon. Ifs an internal struggle for her, she tries so hard to fit in, at the funeral, then with David, seeking acknowledgement from him. This first becomes apparent when she asks David to “go to a real bar” When they enter the bar area, the narrator notices the parking lot, and the vehicles who inhabit it. Expecting something crazy to happen, trying to get David to show some kind of overpayment for her wicked choice.

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Instead he is trying to get her to back out, knowing she won’t. Then they leave the bar, the narrator half drunk, not careering about David running the red lights, they go to a secluded area. Smoking a joint, enjoying the scenery. She thinks she should be observant for rattle snakes, but pushes that thought away, reasoning internally that ‘When I’m with David, forget about worldly dangers” Once again elevating David to a state which is unreachable and therefore lowers the odds that she will get the attention she craves so much.

And when David finally opens up, asking for some kind of comfort or advice, she is unable to give him the answer he wants. Frustrated that she can’t offer David the consolation, she starts to talk about expectations which give her Davit’s attention. Cowboys and Indians, cats and dogs, white and black, Yin and yang. Two opposites trying to co-exist. The narrator is lost, she can’t figure out which camp she fits in, she moves like a Hamilton in both, and therefore she is lost.

Trying to figure out who she really is, she seeks Davit’s attention to get a glimpse of her own reflection. Throughout the story it is clear that David means a lot to her. The story he told her and her sister about the crazy bear man, her ride with him to the bar, her forgetting to look for rattle snakes. It’s all because of David and his influence on her. In the end she does not find the answer, instead she wonders why David knows whom he is not. And maybe that is her answer.