Envirothon Trees 5th

What are the parts of a simple leaf? (5)
leaf blade, petiole, node, bud, stem
What are the parts of a compound leaf? (5)
leaflet, petiole, node, bud, stem
Colorado Blue Spruce
describe needles
4 sided needles, stiff, in-curved, spiny, pointed to 1/4 inch, usually blush green, persist for 7-10 years
Colorado Blue Spruce
describe twigs
orange brown turning gray brown with age; without hairs; buds dark orange-brown
Colorado Blue Spruce
Fruit
cones to 4″ long; cylindrical; tapering slightly at tips; shiny chestnut brown;scales with irregularly toothed margins
Colorado Blue Spruce
General
ornamental plant; grows to 150 feet; slow growing and long lived
Flowering Dogwoods
leaves
opposite; simple; 3-5 inches long; clustered toward tips of twigs, margins smooth or wavy; veins prominent and curved like a bow; foliage bright red in autumn
Flowering Dogwoods
twigs
red tinged with green, often with a bluish white powdery coating; marked with rings; tips curve upwards;
Flowering Dogwoods
leaf buds
each leaf bud covered by 2 reddish scales; side leaf buds very small; flower buds conspicuous, silvery, button shaped at end of leaves
Flowering Dogwood
fruit
egg-shaped drupe, 1/2 to 3/5″ long; coat red; flesh yellowish; stone grooved, 2 celled; usually in clusters of 2-5; persist after leaves fall
Flowering Dogwood
fruit (flowers)
greenish white or yellowish; small; in flat topped clusters; four showy white bracts underneath; open before the leaves
Flowering Dogwood
general
bark red-brown to reddish gray, broken by fissures into small blocks like an alligator hide; a small native tree with low spreading crown valued for ornamental planting; wood used for textile weaving shuttles; varieties with red or pink bracts have been developed
Norway Spruce
leaves
evergreen needles occur singly, spirally arranged on twigs, sharp pointed, four sided, usually 3/4″ long and dark green
Norway Spruce
twigs
bright golden brown; buds egg shaped, darker than twigs
Norway Spruce
fruit
cylindrical cone 4-7″ long, light brown, scales with finely toothed margin, broader than long
Norway Spruce
bark
relatively thin, reddish brown, scaly, becoming gray-brown but rarely furrowed on old trees
Norway Spruce
general
European species, valued naturalized member of the forest, ornamental, large with dense conical crown; branchlets droop on older trees; wood used for paper pulp, boxes, crates and lumber
Red Maple
leaves
opposite, simple with 3-5 shallow lobes, coarsely toothed, light green above, pale green to whitish beneath, turning brilliant red or orange in autumn
Eastern White Pine
leaves
evergreen needles in clusters of 5; soft-flexible, 3 sided, 2 1/2 – 5″ long, bluish green. Only pine native to PA with 5 needles per cluster
Red Maple
twigs
slender, glossy, at first green later red
Red Maple
fruit
wings usually less than 1″ long; spreading at a narrow angle, red to brown, mature in May or June
Red Maple
bark
smooth and light gray on young trunks and branches; older trunks turn darker, shaggy and roughened with ling irregular peeling flakes
Red Maple
general
found throughout PA in variety of habitats, typically reaching 50′ high, grows best in wet soils, sometimes over 100′; also known as Soft maple because wood is not as hard as Sugar maple; ornamental; young trees browsed by deer and rabbits, rodents eat seeds
Eastern White Pine
twigs
slender, flexible, with rusty hairs when young, later smooth, buds egg-shaped
Eastern White Pine
fruit
cones 5-8 inches long, without prickles, slightly curved, resinous; each scale usually bears 2 winged seeds as do all our native pines
Eastern White Pine
bark
young trunks and branches greenish brown, later darker grooved and scaly
Eastern White Pine
General
Eastern white pines are large, usually 50-9-‘ currently, but original “Penn’s Woods” saw these pines reaching 150’; valuable timber tree, found in moist or dry woodlands; ornamental; squirrels, birds, mice and chipmunks eat seeds and soft needles; deer browse twigs; porcupine eat inner bark in winter