Facing Monsters

His reaction to this cruel act of betrayal was to use the seemingly endless fortune that he inherited from ABA e Bosons to commit numerous acts of retribution upon those who had wronged him. To execute t Hess acts of justice, he had to drastically change himself. In doing so he becomes the Count of Mo .NET Crisis. At the end of the novel when he commits his final acts of revenge, he is so far from E Edmond, that there is practically no resemblance to the character in the exposition of the story.

The massive changes to Edmonds Personality are something that I can truly I identify with. In the particular instance that almost mirrors the conflict that Edmond h ad endured, I had thirsted for the (what I now know, unsatisfying) drink of vengeance. Thinking back onto the argument, what really bothers me is the fact that no matter how hard I try, I c Anton recall the cause of the quarrel between me and my friend. Although I can’t recollect the initial cause of our disagreement, I remember the following events very well.

After the argument made a vow that I loud do every last possible thing in my power to cause my friend even the slip shiest discomfort. In the following days, I planned, plotted, and schemed. Every chance I had, I s poke ill Of him created malicious gossip that I hoped that he would eventually hear. Within o only a couple of days, my teacher pulled me aside and explained to me that she had been app reached by my friend and that he was very upset because he had heard untrue rumors. My r moors.

I instantly denied it and with me being only in elementary school, the teacher believed t at honestly was telling the truth. After that conversation, I never looked at myself the same gag main- In only those few moments in which conversed with my teacher, I had lost something that wish I could’ve held onto longer. My innocence. In both Dent’s and my conquest for revenge, we both changed so much that at the resolution of our conflict, we were no longer the same person in a way. In the case of Dances, he realizes that he has been almost gullible for believing the lies of his those who betray him.

In his realization, he loses the innocence and easily trusting quality that was so blat ant in old Dances. With me, I lost my innocence when I realized how much I had actually change d over something that I should have just let go. Edmonds conflict is very relatable to me because I have been through a simile realization that was almost identical to the one that Dances had in the Chateau u dif. Although we went to different measures to get our revenge, we both tried as hard as we p sibyl could to get it.