Occupational Safety & Health Acronyms

OSHA

Occupational Safety and Health Administration

 

Government agency tasked with developing and enforcing standards of safety and health in the workplace. 

 

Hotline: (800)321-OSHA

www.osha.gov

Safety
Deals with acute effects of hazards.
Health
Deals with chronic effects of hazards.
CPSC

Consumer Product Safety Commission

 

Government agency tasked to ensure the safety of products going to end consumers.

 

Hotline: (800)638-2772

www.cpsc.gov

 

 

EPA

Environmental Protection Agency

 

 

CSP

Certified Safety Professional

 

Designated certification for Safety Professionals

 

Board of Certified Safety Professionals of America

208 Burwash Ave.

Savoy, IL 61874

(217)359-9263

www.bcsp.org

CIH

Certified Industrial Hygienist

 

Designated certification for health professionals

 

American Board of Industrial Hygiene

6015 West St. Joseph, Suite 102

Lansing, MI 48917

(517)321-2638

www.abih.org

ASSE

American Society of Safety Engineers

 

1800 East Oakton Street

Des Plaines, IL 60018

(847)699-2929

www.asse.org

AIHA

American Industrial Hygiene Association

 

2700 Prosperity Avenue, Suite 250

Fairfax, VA 22031

(703)849-8888

www.aiha.org

ACGIH

American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists

 

1330 Kemper Meadow Drive

Cincinnati, OH 45240

(513) 742-2020

www.acgih.org

NSC

National Safety Council

1121 SPRING Lake Drive

Itasca, IL  60143

(630) 285-1121

www.nsc.org

NIOSH

National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health

Source of technical information for questions about safety and health.

Hotline: (800) 35-NIOSH

www.niosh.org

Worker’s Compensation
Statutory compensation levels to be paid by the employer for various injuries that may be incurred by the worker.
Recordkeeping

ANSI standardized and designated the Z16.1 system (voluntary recordkeeping)

;

OSHA set mandatory requirements similar to Z16.1 system in the 1970’s.

Federal Register
The official public notification device of the Federal Government.
Incidence rates
Includes all injuries or illnesses that require medical, treatment, plus fatalities.
BLS
US. Bureau of Labor Statistics (Recordkeeping 1978)
LWDI

Lost-WorkDay-Cases Incidence Rate

 

Counts injury (exclude illness) cases involving “lost workdays”, which include restricted work activity days. Fatalities are not included.

Direct costs (or “tip of the iceberg”)
Payment of worker’s compensation insurance premiums, which are based on a firm’s injury and illness experience.
Hidden costs (or indirect costs)

The intangible costs of accidents, although hidden are much greater than the direct costs:

 

Wages, Lost supervisory time, co-worker’s lost time during the emergency, damaged equipment, ruined product, overtime for production to catch back up, learning curve for replacement worker, clerical costs.

ADA

Americans with Disabilities Act (1990)

;

Protects disabled persons from job discrimination.

HIV and AIDS

Human Immunodeficiency Virus

Aquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome

;

Health professionals are the primary at-risk occupations for bloodborne pathogens

HBV

Hepatitis B Virus

;

This virus actually kills more victims than does HIV.

Workplace Violence
The leading cause of occupational fatalities for working women and the second leading cause for working men.
Safety factors
Margins for variation;for the chance element in safety.
Fail-safe principles

Additional principles of engineering design that consider the consequences of component failure within the system:

;

1. General fail-safe principle

2. Fail-safe principle of redundancy

3. Principle of worst cause.

General Fail-safe principle
The resulting status of a system, in the event of failure of one of its components, shall be in a safe mode.
Redundancy
A critically important;function of a system, subsytem, or components can be preserved by alternate parallel or standby units.
Worst case
The design of a system should consider the worst situation to which it may be subjected in use.
Design principles
Variety of methods to reduce or eliminate hazards.
FMEA

Failure Modes and Effects Analysis

;

Method to trace the effects of individual component failures on the overall, or “catastrophic”, failure of equipment.

Fault-tree analysis
Method of analysis that concentrates on the end result, which is usually an accident or some other adverse consequence of the probabilities associated with the various causes and their effects.
Toxicology
The study of the nature and effects of poisons.
Epidemiology
The study of epidemics in people.
Cost-benefit analysis
Method that provides the comparison between the benefits of improving safety and health versus the costs of capital investment alternatives to provide such improvements.
Hazards-classification Scale
Method of;classifying hazards;into categories to support the decision to eliminate hazards on a worst to first basis.