Strategies in change management

I think the task is about a 9 on the difficulty scale. Taking a company that is established and set in its ways and changing the very core of it is a huge undertaking; especially when the very start of a project can be derailed due to office politics. By providing Chris with the list of staff that he recommended, Mario was doing the project a disservice. He was putting Chris in an awkward position should those on that list not be the best for the Job. Unfortunately, “only the CEO can ensure that the organization get the required resources and is free to create processes & aloes that are appropriate to the new challenge” Kick 72).

This leaves Chris in a tricky position. He has to keep the boss happy so that the project does not run into problems, but he also needs to ensure that he has the right people for the project. If he accepts any of the people on the list he will be setting himself up for failure. “Personnel problems that can be ignored during easy times can cause serious trouble in a tougher, faster-moving, globalization economy'(Cotter, 63). The project could start out Just fine, and down the road at crunch time, they may find out that the questionable team members are unable to keep up.

This could throw everyone involved off as they all scramble to make up for those shortcomings. “When people fail to develop the coalition needed to guide change, the most common reason is that down deep they really don’t think that a transformation is necessary or they don’t think a strong team is needed to direct the change” (Cotter 67). Ideally, if Chris’ managers want the project to succeed they will accept his reasons for choosing the team members, and rejecting others. If the project gets bogged down in office politics, then it really must not be that important. 2. The main thing Chris needs to do s be true to the project.

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He needs to build his team with people that he trusts. “When trust is present, you will usually be able to create teamwork. When it is missing, you won’t” (Cotter, 63). This is going to be difficult for Chris to do because already he is under pressure to include people that, upon inspection, would not be the best for the project. If he goes against his manager’s wishes, everything could be held up in who belongs on the team. “One of the hallmarks of a great manager is the ability to identify the right person for the Job and to train the employees to succeed t the Jobs they’re given” Kick 61).

One of the reasons Chris was chosen to head this task was because his managers saw in him the ability to lead this, and make change for Nestle. Chris has to stand firm in his ability to choose the best employees for the jobs. Once the team is established, Chris will need to make sure that everyone on the team is focused on doing what is best for the company. They have to have a clear mission statement that that they all believe in and support. “To succeed consistently, good managers need to be skilled not Just in assessing people but also in assessing he abilities and disabilities of their organization as a whole” Kick 61).

The task force has to see what position Nestle is currently in. They need to measure the strengths and weaknesses of the company in order to develop opportunity for change. For Chris to succeed, he will need full support from the company as well as “that the project not be forced to compete for resources with projects in the mainstream organization” Kick 69). The project needs to be stand alone and not be required to must. They need to not have to be concerned about the project getting cut, and they need to know that management is behind them.

The project requires strong leadership. “Without a powerful guiding coalition, change stalls and carnage grows” (Cotter 68). This will be evidenced quite quickly when Chris makes his decision about the employees he wants to be involved. If he caves to the list provided by his manager, already it is evident that he will be unlikely to stand firm when his plans face pressure from upper management. This does not bode well for the project. Management could potentially derail the project at every turn, and ultimately bury it.

However, if Chris stands firm, and chooses the member that he believes are the best or the Job, he will have already started the project off as a strong leader focused on success. 3. Chris should go with his gut and do what is best for the project. If it creates waves right from the start, that is k. In the end when the project is accomplished and is strong and successful, the conflicts will be in the past. Perhaps there won’t actually be any conflict. Chris can put together the information he used to compile his team and present his findings on both the people he wants to use and the people he does not want to use to those in charge.