The Cultures of Racial and Ethnic Minorities Causing Mental Illness

The cultures of racial and ethnic minorities influence many aspects of mental illness in the United States, including how patients from a given culture communicate and manifest their symptoms, their style of coping, their family and community support, and their willingness to seek treatment. Cultural and social influences are not the only determinants of mental illness and patterns of service use, but they do play important roles. The condition of mental illness is affecting minorities in greater numbers than whites in the United States. Accessibility to care for minorities with mental illness is very difficult.

Minorities are more skeptical to seek the proper care for this disease. Shame, stigmatism, discrimination, and mistrust also keep minorities from seeking treatment when it is needed, along with not having medical insurance. Racism and discrimination is another factor along with the mistrust of the health care system and the bias attitude of the physicians. The U.S government and private health care providers are currently trying to create a more systematic approach for States and local communities to extend health and mental health care to their uninsured residents.

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In the United States cultural and social factors contribute to the causation of mental illness, yet that contribution varies by disorder. Mental illness is considered the product of a complex interaction among biological, psychological, social, and cultural factors. The role of any of these major factors can be stronger or weaker depending on the specific disorder.

Ethnic and racial minorities in the United States face a social and economic environment of inequality that includes greater exposure to racism, discrimination, violence, and poverty. Living in poverty has the most measurable effect on mental illness. Majority of minorities within the lower income bracket, with less education, and basically blue collar occupations are about two to three times more likely than those in the higher income brackets, who have higher degree of education to have a mental disorder. Racism and discrimination are stressful events that adversely affect health and mental health of minorities.

They place minorities at risk for mental disorders such as depression and anxiety. Shame, stigmatism plays a very important role within the communities and families of minorities when dealing with mental illness. Whites are more acceptable to speak on mental illness when it pertains to family members or friends; whereas minorities consider mental illness as taboo, many feel it’s the work of the devil and to speak about this matter will bring shame upon the family.

Majority of minorities do not trust the health care industry more less mental health services. The mistrust is an important reason deterring minorities from seeking treatment. The concerns are reinforced by evidence, both directly and indirectly, of Cultural and social factors contribute to the causation of mental illness, yet that contribution varies by disorder. The role of any of these major factors can be stronger or weaker depending on the specific disorder.

In the United States their are Clinical environments that do not respect, or are incompatible with, the cultures of the people they serve may deter minorities from using services and receiving appropriate care of clinician bias and stereotyping behavior. The cultures of racial and ethnic minorities alter the types of mental health services they need. Clinical environments that do not respect, or are incompatible with, the cultures of the people they serve may deter minorities from using services and receiving appropriate care.

The Nation’s health systems must improve the quality of mental health services for minorities. Many racial and ethnic minorities live in areas where general health care and mental health care are in short supply. A major course of action is to improve geographic availability of mental health services. Another step towards better access to care is to integrate mental health care and primary care. Primary care is where many minority individuals prefer to receive mental health care and where most people who need treatment are first recognized and diagnosed.

A variety of research and demonstration programs have been or will be created to strengthen the capacity of these providers to meet the demand for mental health services and to encourage integrated primary health care and mental health care services that match the needs of the diverse communities they serve. Another major step in improving access to treatment for mental health services is to improve language access. Improving communication between clinicians and patients is essential to mental health care.

Finally, a major way to improve access to mental health services is to coordinate care to vulnerable, groups. People from all backgrounds may experience disparities in prevalence of illness, access to services, and quality of services if they are in under served populations such as people who are incarcerated or homeless and children living in out of home placements.

Improving the quality of mental health care is a vital goal for the Nation. Persons with mental illness who receive quality care are more likely to stay in treatment and to have better outcomes. This result is critical, as many treatments require at least four to six weeks to show a clear benefit to the patient. Through relief of distress and disability, consumers can begin to recover from mental illness. They can become more productive and make more fulfilling contributions to themselves, family and community.

A development plan was designed for the clinicians is support capacity development encourages all mental health professionals to develop their skills in tailoring treatment to age, gender, race, ethnicity, and culture. In addition, minorities are dramatically underrepresented among mental health providers, researchers, administrators, policy makers, and consumer and family organizations, racial and ethnic minorities are encouraged to enter the mental health field.

Training programs and funding sources also need to work toward equitable racial and ethnic minority representation in all these groups. Mental health promotion and mental illness prevention can improve the health of a community and the Nation. Because mental health is adversely affected by chronic social conditions such as poverty, community violence, racism, and discrimination, the reduction of these adverse conditions is quite likely to be vital to improving the mental health of racial and ethnic minorities. Efforts to prevent mental illness and promote mental health should build on the community strengths such as spirituality, positive ethnic identity, traditional values, educational attainment, and local leadership. Programs founded on individual, family, and community strengths have the potential to both ameliorate risk and foster resilience.

Families are the primary source of care and support for the majority of adults and children with mental problems or disorders. Efforts to promote mental health for racial and ethnic minorities must include strategies to strengthen families to function at the full potential and to mitigate the stressful effects of caring for a relative with mental illness or a serious emotional disturbance.

Along with family and the health care industry we can provide ways to help minorities in getting the proper treatment for mental illness.

The cultures of racial and ethnic minorities influence many aspects of mental illness in the United States, including how patients from a given culture communicate and manifest their symptoms, their style of coping, their family and community support, and their willingness to seek treatment. Cultural and social influences are not the only determinants of mental illness and patterns of service use, but they do play important roles. The condition of mental illness is affecting minorities in greater numbers than whites in the United States.

Accessibility to care for minorities with mental illness is very difficult. Minorities are more skeptical to seek the proper care for this disease. Shame, stigmatism, discrimination, and mistrust also keep minorities from seeking treatment when it is needed, along with not having medical insurance. Racism and discrimination is another factor along with the mistrust of the health care system and the bias attitude of the physicians. The U.S government and private health care providers are currently trying to create a more systematic approach for States and local communities to extend health and mental health care to their uninsured residents.

In the United States cultural and social factors contribute to the causation of mental illness, yet that contribution varies by disorder. Mental illness is considered the product of a complex interaction among biological, psychological, social, and cultural factors. The role of any of these major factors can be stronger or weaker depending on the specific disorder.

Ethnic and racial minorities in the United States face a social and economic environment of inequality that includes greater exposure to racism, discrimination, violence, and poverty. Living in poverty has the most measurable effect on mental illness. Majority of minorities within the lower income bracket, with less education, and basically blue collar occupations are about two to three times more likely than those in the higher income brackets, who have higher degree of education to have a mental disorder. Racism and discrimination are stressful events that adversely affect health and mental health of minorities.

They place minorities at risk for mental disorders such as depression and anxiety. Shame, stigmatism plays a very important role within the communities and families of minorities when dealing with mental illness. Whites are more acceptable to speak on mental illness when it pertains to family members or friends; whereas minorities consider mental illness as taboo, many feel it’s the work of the devil and to speak about this matter will bring shame upon the family.

Majority of minorities do not trust the health care industry more less mental health services. The mistrust is an important reason deterring minorities from seeking treatment. The concerns are reinforced by evidence, both directly and indirectly, of Cultural and social factors contribute to the causation of mental illness, yet that contribution varies by disorder.

The role of any of these major factors can be stronger or weaker depending on the specific disorder. In the United States their are Clinical environments that do not respect, or are incompatible with, the cultures of the people they serve may deter minorities from using services and receiving appropriate care of clinician bias and stereotyping behavior. The cultures of racial and ethnic minorities alter the types of mental health services they need. Clinical environments that do not respect, or are incompatible with, the cultures of the people they serve may deter minorities from using services and receiving appropriate care.

The Nation’s health systems must improve the quality of mental health services for minorities. Many racial and ethnic minorities live in areas where general health care and mental health care are in short supply. A major course of action is to improve geographic availability of mental health services. Another step towards better access to care is to integrate mental health care and primary care. Primary care is where many minority individuals prefer to receive mental health care and where most people who need treatment are first recognized and diagnosed.

A variety of research and demonstration programs have been or will be created to strengthen the capacity of these providers to meet the demand for mental health services and to encourage integrated primary health care and mental health care services that match the needs of the diverse communities they serve.

Another major step in improving access to treatment for mental health services is to improve language access. Improving communication between clinicians and patients is essential to mental health care. Finally, a major way to improve access to mental health services is to coordinate care to vulnerable, groups. People from all backgrounds may experience disparities in prevalence of illness, access to services, and quality of services if they are in under served populations such as people who are incarcerated or homeless and children living in out of home placements.

Improving the quality of mental health care is a vital goal for the Nation. Persons with mental illness who receive quality care are more likely to stay in treatment and to have better outcomes. This result is critical, as many treatments require at least four to six weeks to show a clear benefit to the patient. Through relief of distress and disability, consumers can begin to recover from mental illness. They can become more productive and make more fulfilling contributions to themselves, family and community.

A development plan was designed for the clinicians is support capacity development encourages all mental health professionals to develop their skills in tailoring treatment to age, gender, race, ethnicity, and culture. In addition, minorities are dramatically underrepresented among mental health providers, researchers, administrators, policy makers, and consumer and family organizations, racial and ethnic minorities are encouraged to enter the mental health field.

Training programs and funding sources also need to work toward equitable racial and ethnic minority representation in all these groups. Mental health promotion and mental illness prevention can improve the health of a community and the Nation. Because mental health is adversely affected by chronic social conditions such as poverty, community violence, racism, and discrimination, the reduction of these adverse conditions is quite likely to be vital to improving the mental health of racial and ethnic minorities.

Efforts to prevent mental illness and promote mental health should build on the community strengths such as spirituality, positive ethnic identity, traditional values, educational attainment, and local leadership. Programs founded on individual, family, and community strengths have the potential to both ameliorate risk and foster resilience.

Families are the primary source of care and support for the majority of adults and children with mental problems or disorders. Efforts to promote mental health for racial and ethnic minorities must include strategies to strengthen families to function at the full potential and to mitigate the stressful effects of caring for a relative with mental illness or a serious emotional disturbance.

Along with family and the health care industry we can provide ways to help minorities in getting the proper treatment for mental illness.