Women in Combat

This fight is called equality to all men and women. Today these organizations find themselves face to face with a lingering decision that has been looming over its head for decades. Should the military allow women in combat arms units? There are many people who feel that this will create problems such as gender roles confusion, woman are not physically or mentally built for these jobs, and that men will not be able to control themselves around women in a mamba setting.

While others feel that there should not be any limitations set on women because of their genetic makeup; however there are some women who are stronger than some men. Also, that men should know how to conduct themselves around women and saying so is outrageous because there are many women who are serving in a support occupation are on the front line with men every day in today’s conflicts. Women in Combat There are many issues in the United States military, one of which is whether female Soldiers and Marines should be allowed into combat roles and Military Occupation Specialties (MOSs), let alone ground combat units.

The effects of females in these roles and units and the overall mission success need to consider. “Women have been serving in the military since the Armed Services Integration Act became took effect in 1948” (MacKenzie, 2013, par. 7). Being a former soldier of almost 12 years, I have seen what women in these positions do to the military and these units. Have seen both sides of the spectrum when it comes to this issue. Have seen firsthand the effects of having females in all male units and MOSS.

Women should be allowed in Combat Roles or Military Occupation Specialties (MOMS). Women may smaller in size ND not quite as physically strong as men; however they are just as mentally tough, if not more. While some MOSS are physically designed for men, women having been proving themselves every day that they can do the same things their male counterparts are doing. They are starting to make the needed efforts to prove themselves in the high physical demanding roles. “Women are now allowed to try and join elite groups such as the Navy S.

E. A. L. S, Army Rangers or on Special Forces squadrons. Female Soldiers who are able to pass the rigorous selection processes are now serving in Afghanistan alongside with Army Rangers and Special Forces teams” (Dreaded, 2011). As quoted by a philosopher C. Jobbery (2012), “The strength of a woman is not measured by the impact that all her hardships in life have had on her, but the strength of a woman is measured by the extent of her refusal to allow those hardships to dictate her and who she becomes. Since 2009 women have also been integrated into combat units in groups such as Lioness Teams, which in turn; the military has started creating F-male Engagement Teams (Feet). These FEET teams have conducted almost 1 00 search-and-engagement missions in Afghanistan, and have been seed in Iraq to question the women along with searching them if needed as it is seen as wrong and immoral for a man to search them (MacKenzie, 2013). In April 201 2, The Army opened six new combat related MOSs to women that include BIB combat engineer, BIB cannon crewmen, 1 B infantryman, and 1 K MI armor crewman (MacKenzie, 2013).

There have even been talks that the Marine Corps will also soon be following suit. In saying that, they will still have to complete the same requirements as men, which seem to be Very doable by all means. Women can be ready for any combat situation if properly trained and prepared. It takes physical strength not mental strength to pull a trigger; and women are proving themselves more and more when it comes to this. Women have been earning the right to join their brothers on the frontline as soon as the graduated from boot camp. Iraq and Afghanistan feature guerilla wars with no fixed front lines, so female troops driving supply trucks on ostensibly noncombatant missions have been regularly attacked” (Dreaded, 2011, par. 5). Hundreds of female soldiers have been awarded the Combat Action Badge (which is given for actively being engaged with a hostile enemy). Women have been sacrificing their lives for this entry, which seems to not get acknowledged. “Over 1 50 women have died in both Iraq and Afghanistan; nearly 67% of them were in combat’ (Dreaded, 201 1, par. ). Women have proven that they can overcome any challenge and survive any situation in which they may face. Saying that females are a disturbance to the battle readiness of a unit is terrible excuse. Male soldiers seeing each other as brothers in arms and looking out for each other; it shouldn’t be any different when it comes to women. Most male soldiers already look out for the female soldiers as they see them as their little sister. Although it can be argued that women are emotional, men are just as emotional. Despite critics’ fears, women are not falling apart on the battlefield, nor have they had much impact on military readiness or morale” (Yeager, 2010). Now that the bans are being lifted it is providing more opportunities for female promotion. When being considered for promotion, military officials kick at a Soldiers service record for any specialized schools, disciplinary actions, awards, medals, and combat experience. A key factor to getting promoted is having combat experience. Since women were not being allowed into combat situations, it was making it extremely hard to move up in the ranks let alone prove themselves.

An additional added benefit is that “FEET teams are also now receiving combat pay or “hostile fire/ imminent danger” pay, that acknowledges the threats being faced by women” (MacKenzie, 2013, par. 12). “Women will be a sexual distraction on the battlefield, and that nature will inevitably take its course. Human nature will inevitably take its natural course, no matter how hard the social engineers among us may wish otherwise or even try to suppress it, with temporary success” (Tips, 2012). Although people see this as being true, it is just a generalized stereotype, such as men and women being just friends.

They could say the same about homosexual men, but as long as they don’t tell anyone they can join the same MOSS as any other man. The military is taught to be professional in all situations and having different sexes in the same MOSs and roles should be no different. Sexual harassment has been another tremendous issue for women, which has led to military officials constantly worrying about these situations. Erin Morgan a 2nd Lieutenant in the Army Intelligence Corps dated “It is incredibly tough to be a Woman in a man’s world, however they are adapting quite well. 2nd LET Morgan also stated a few days before her graduation from the West Point Academy “Women still do not have an easy time fitting in” and that “Soldiering is a masculine trait, something that separates the men from the women and the men from the boys; That is something that cadets still struggle with” (Yeager, 2007). Women have been proving themselves time and time again over the past years, which has allowed them to succeed in the ranking and overcome many obstacles during their service. Women in leadership positions who primarily deal with troops, have reported that they have had to prove themselves time and time again.

Many men see females who are in leadership positions to be intimidating and kick down on them. On January 24, 201 3, the ban was removed which allowed women more choices to choose from during combat. Several military leaders have pushed for these roles to be opened up to female soldiers as they have been proving to be highly effective and successful in combat. Several other countries have already started allowing women to serve in combat roles. In Israel women already can enlist to be a part of infantry units.